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Table 2 Mean onset time of pain relief (estimated in minutes) among the 3 groups

From: Is there any role for topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of mild to moderate musculoskeletal pain in a Lebanese community pharmacy?

Mean onset in each group (min) “i” Mean onset in each group (min) “j” Mean onset difference among groups (min): “i − j” p value 95 % CI
Topical (17.3) Systemic (30) −12.7 0.001* −16.3631 −9.1241
Combination (14.5) 2.8 0.28 −1.1952 6.7080
Systemic (30) Topical (17.3) 12.7 0.001* 9.1241 16.3631
Combination (14.5) 15.5 0.001* 11.0464 19.9536
Combination (14.5) Topical (17.3) −2.8 0.28 −6.7080 1.1952
Systemic (30) −15.5 0.001* −19.9536 −11.0464
  1. Onset time of pain relief is defined as the time required after administration of NSAID for a response to be observed. Patients required a mean of 17.3 min to feel pain relief in topical NSAID group, 30 min in systemic NSAID group and 14.5 min in combination group
  2. Mean onset difference among groups was calculated by subtracting mean onset of each 2 groups (i−j). One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was performed to assess if there is a significant difference in the mean onset time of pain relief among groups. Topical NSAIDSs were significantly faster than systemic by 12.7 min (p value <0.05, 95 % CI). Combination therapy was significantly faster than systemic by 15.5 min (p value <0.05, 95 % CI). Topical NSAIDs were insignificantly slower than combination group by 2.8 min (p value = 0.28, 95 % CI)
  3. * The mean onset difference among groups is significant at p value <0.05 and 95 % confidence interval