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Table 1 Case study postoperative emergence agitation

From: Routines for reducing the occurrence of emergence agitation during awakening in children, a national survey

This questions has only, yes/no/do not know alternatives Anesthesiologist (%) Nurse anesthetist (%) All (%)
1. How do you deal with anesthesia before, during and after this new operation?
a Premedication with midazolam 26/58/6 37/44/19 37/51/12
n = 394 n = 600 n = 994
b Premedication with clonidine 59/31/10 37/27/36 48/29/23
n = 406 n = 610 n = 1004
c Propofol-based anesthesia 70/24/6 71/15/14 71/19/10
n = 402 n = 610 n = 1012
d Sevoflurane-based anesthesia 43/49/8 47/34/19 45/42/13
n = 389 n = 600 n = 989
e Desflurane-based anesthesia 11/82/7 5/75/20 8/78/14
n = 401 n = 500 n = 901
f Administration of low-dose propofol before waking up of patient 45/45/10 52/24/24 48/35/17
n = 400 n = 569 n = 969
g Administration of clonidine before waking up of patient 33/52/15 17/42/41 25/47/28
n = 389 n = 437 n = 826
h Administration of opioid before waking up of patient 62/31/7 69/16/15 65/24/11
n = 398 n = 500 n = 898
2. Do you use any form of diagnostic kits, e.g. Paediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium (PAED) scale at PEA in children? 1/81/18 1/60/39 1/75/24
n = 407 n = 546 n = 953
  1. Questions 1 and 2 response rates are shown as percentage, respondents had 3 choices.